Montford historic district door restoration

Here we are stripping the 100 years of built-up lead paint from these original old-growth pine doors.  The client decided to have them painted, so I will be priming them with Benjamin Moore Enamel undercoat for the smoothest possible finish.  

We are using the silent paint remover to remove the paint.  This process is followed by sanding every inch of the doors with 80 then 120 grit sandpaper.  

All repairs are made using Abatron epoxy system and nails holes filled with ready patch.

The original door bell has been stripped by allowing the hardware to soak overnight in a crock pot with water and a couple tablespoons of baking soda.  After soaking I clean remaining residue with a small nylon bristle brush and rinse in warm water.  This is followed by polishing with extra fine steel wool.

 

Abatron epoxy repair to bottom corner.  First, 10 3/16" holes were drilled into corner to provide a mechanical bond between the door and epoxy.  A strip of wood was taped to edge to provide a square corner for the epoxy to flow to. 

North Asheville window restoration

We are restoring all the windows in this 1920s bungalow. 

 Before shot displays failing paint, typical overpaint on glass and broken panes. 

Before shot displays failing paint, typical overpaint on glass and broken panes. 

Here Mikey is applying the finish coat of Benjamin Moore aura, making it look easy. 
Here Mikey is applying the finish coat of Benjamin Moore aura, making it look easy. 
 The Lab

The Lab

 First one completed

First one completed

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Locked and loaded.  Ready for your next project. Give us a call today. 

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Porch floor

Here is a job I completed in the unca neighborhood where the entire porch framing was reconstructed due to termite damage.  

After constructing a solid and square frame, new tongue and groove pine flooring was laid.  

I was in a hurry and unfourtanetly did not get a picture of the new framing. I used all pressure treated lumber with 2x8 joist In hangers @16".  

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 The white at the seams is from priming the bottoms of the planks before laying, to seal and protect the new floor. The floor was painted to match existing. 

The white at the seams is from priming the bottoms of the planks before laying, to seal and protect the new floor. The floor was painted to match existing. 

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Quarter round window restoration

This is a window I'm currently restoring in the Historic Grove Park Inn neighborhood.  

I am performing a full restoration. Window completely deglazed using steam, all paint has been stripped, glass polished and beginning application of oil primer. 

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Window restoration

This is a six light window I am performing a full restoration. Here you see a window stripped of all of the hundred-year-old paint. The sash has been disassembled in order to replace a damaged Muntin. The new Muntin will be hand cut with a coping saw for a precise fit.

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Paint stripping performed using the silent paint remover infrared heater. 

Are your Windows Energy Efficient?

A window's energy efficiency is dependent upon all of its components. Window frames conduct heat, contributing to a window's overall energy efficiency, particularly its U-factor. Glazing or glass technologies have become very sophisticated, and designers often specify different types of glazing or glass for different windows, based on orientation, climate, building design, etc.

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Another important consideration is how the windows operate, because some operating types have lower air leakage rates than others, which will improve your home's energy efficiency. Traditional operating types include:

  • Awning. Hinged at the top and open outward. Because the sash closes by pressing against the frame, they generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows.
  • Casement. Hinged at the sides. Like awning windows, they generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows because the sash closes by pressing against the frame.
  • Fixed. Fixed panes that don't open. When installed properly they're airtight, but are not suitable in places where window ventilation is desired.
  • Hopper. Hinged at the bottom and open inward. Like both awning and casement, they generally have lower air leakage rates because the sash closes by pressing against the frame.
  • Single- and double-hung. Both sashes slide vertically in a double-hung window. Only the bottom sash slides upward in a single-hung window. These sliding windows generally have higher air leakage rates than projecting or hinged windows.
  • Single- and double-sliding. Both sashes slide horizontally in a double-sliding window. Only one sash slides in a single-sliding window. Like single- and double-hung windows, they generally have higher air leakage rates than projecting or hinged windows.